Projects

Exploring a Māori classificatory system of flora and fauna within Tainui waka

For many years, the knowledge of indigenous peoples has been the preserve of Western anthropologists and ethnographers. Like other indigenous people, Māori are concerned with the ongoing neglect, misuse and erosion of traditional ecological knowledge. This is further compounded by the loss of key knowledge holders over the years and their scarcity today.

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Food Sovereignty from an Indigenous perspective: Case studies of Maori of Aotearoa and Quechua peoples of Peru

Region: 

My PhD topic addresses the question:  Is Indigenous knowledge able to contribute to food security?

This PhD thesis investigates how the knowledge possessed by Indigenous people – New Zealand Māori and Peruvian Andeans – can contribute to improving food security.  . This comparative research focuses on the Māori principle of ‘Te Ātanoho’ or ‘good life’ and ‘Sumaq Kawsay’, the Andean principle of ‘good living’.  I am investigating traditional food production from an Indigenous perspective.

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For the one who paints such beautiful squares: Sunday Reed and her place in the art and poetry of Sidney Nolan.

Sidney Nolan was just 21 when he met Sunday Reed the woman who would have a profound influence on his art and life long after the relationship between them irrevocably ended.

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Generations: How identity, equality and participation impact the realization of indigenous education rights

The main aim of my doctoral research is to show that specifically indigenous education rights are crucial to the realization of equality in education and other fundamental rights and freedoms for indigenous people. In contrast to prevailing American jurisprudence on discrimination and the kind of rhetoric present in the 2004 Foreshore and Seabed saga which relies on an anonymous model of the liberal individual, I will argue that recognizing and protecting specifically indigenous education rights actually combats discrimination and enhances substantial equality.

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Haka and hula representations in tourism

 Haka and hula performances tell stories that represent histories, traditions, protocols and customs of the Māori and Hawai’ian people and give insight into their lives and the way that they see the world. The way that haka and hula performances are represented is being tested, as the dynamics of the tourism industry impact upon and influence the art forms. If allowed, these impacts and influences can affect the performances and thus manipulate or change the way that haka and hula are represented.

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Harvesting the Fruits of Papatuanuku - A Kaitiaki approach to Geothermal Development

Expertise: 

The reputation of Geothermal Energy as renewable and sustainable makes it highly desirable to Maori - but to date, relatively few have undertaken development of their resources. This project will develop a model for geothermal development that incorporates kaitiakitanga principles.

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