Projects

A Respository of Knowledge: Maatauranga Maori

The purpose of this project is to create a repository of knowledge for all information identified as mātauranga Māori. Having this knowledge recorded and collected within the Sustainable Seas
Challenge will help identify where mātauranga Māori has been used to integrate with other knowledge frameworks, and how it contributed to the distinctive products, processes, systems and services of the Challenge. Other factors that would be captured:
• The source of the mātauranga Māori (who the knowledge came from).

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Project team

A Study of Kawa Whakaruruhau/Cultural Safety Education and its Effect on the Nursing Practice of Recently Graduated Registered Comprehensive Nurses

This study examined the cultural safety education taught in the Diploma of Nursing (now Bachelor of Nursing) course, investigating the effects of this education on the nursing practice of both Māori and non-Māori recently graduated Registered Comprehensive Nurses. The stated learning outcomes of the education were compared with the perceived learning outcomes of the research participants, who were drawn from nurses who completed their nursing education at Whitireia Community Polytechnic in 1994

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A Validation of Māori Social Principles and the Global Fresh Water Crisis by G. Raumati Hook and L. Parehaereone Raumati

The world is facing a water crisis brought on by insufficient resource, poor management, corporate greed, political timidity, and human ignorance. Indigenous peoples all around the world find themselves outraged by the profiteering of transnational corporations as they gain control over precious fresh water reserves and move to commodify the resource. Many statements have been issued pleading for restraint and recognition of the vital nature of fresh water not only for humanity, but for all life on the planet.

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A Whakapapa of Tradition: Ngati Porou Carving 1830 to 1930

Expertise: 

This thesis argues that tradition can be seen to have a whakapapa, in that there is a distinct parentage, a moment of birth, and (occasionally), the demise of a tradition. I am applying this idea to chart change in carving by Ngati Porou over the period 1830-1930. I have chapters on the following: Existing practices, The Church, The Whare Whakairo, Tohunga Whakairo, The Patrons and The 20th Century.

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Project team

Adapting principles from rongoā into ecologically and culturally sustainable farm practice

This project examines rongoā (traditional Māori knowledge of medicinal plants) to find ways to improve animal health naturally, and overall, manage farms with respect for the land.

Principal Investigator Dr Marion Johnson was a farm manager in the UK when she received a scholarship to study environmental biology and returned to university. She later arrived back in New Zealand to complete a PhD on parasites of farmed red deer. For her post-doctoral research, she wanted to focus on sustainable agricultural practices.

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Project team

Aituā: Death in a changing Māori World

Tangi is the ultimate form of Māori cultural and community expression. Addressing the dearth of scholarly information, this study considers tangi practice, whakapapa, changing environments, community values, sharing knowledge, ritual and what it means to be Māori.

The research team has been examining the life-values, beliefs and practices related to contemporary Māori experience of death, primarily through wānanga held two-three times a year. These wānanga involve a wide range of participants from different iwi affiliations, as well as a Pacific Island representative.

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