Projects

A Respository of Knowledge: Maatauranga Maori

The purpose of this project is to create a repository of knowledge for all information identified as mātauranga Māori. Having this knowledge recorded and collected within the Sustainable Seas
Challenge will help identify where mātauranga Māori has been used to integrate with other knowledge frameworks, and how it contributed to the distinctive products, processes, systems and services of the Challenge. Other factors that would be captured:
• The source of the mātauranga Māori (who the knowledge came from).

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Project team

An A-Wh of Māori Grammar and Usage

Region: 

The use of linguistic descriptions, to a large extent, has characterised much of how the Māori language has been described in grammar books and textbooks designed for the teaching and learning of te reo as a second or additional language. This approach tends to describe language at the sentence level of phonology, morphology, and syntactic structures. However, it scarcely makes use of semantic descriptions as a feasible approach to describe language beyond that sentence level.

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He rito whakakīnga whārua: Language value and development in communities

Expertise: 

Even after 30 years of Māori language revitalisation movements, the Māori language continues to be in a perilous state. Despite these efforts there is no one method that can stem the decline as societal factors still impact adversely on language development. The most successful Māori language revitalisation movements are those located at the ‘flax-roots’ level.  However, as highlighted in the Pre-publication of the Waitangi Tribunal’s WAI 262 Report, there are a number of factors that have eroded Māori language revitalisation movements since the mid 1990s.

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Kia Areare ki ngā Reo o ngā Tīpuna – Revitalising the Maori Language Using Archival Recordings

Expertise: 

Despite an increase in the number of people speaking Maori today, the quality of the language being used has declined as the number of native-speakers of Maori language has declined. This seminar is about a research project based on twenty hour-long recordings from Radio Kahungunu featuring two elderly women conversing in the Maori language. The rationale behind the project is to use the recorded voices of elders to help revitalise the Maori language.

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Project team