Projects

An A-Wh of Māori Grammar and Usage

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The use of linguistic descriptions, to a large extent, has characterised much of how the Māori language has been described in grammar books and textbooks designed for the teaching and learning of te reo as a second or additional language. This approach tends to describe language at the sentence level of phonology, morphology, and syntactic structures. However, it scarcely makes use of semantic descriptions as a feasible approach to describe language beyond that sentence level.

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Development of an Indigenous Cultural Impact Assessment Tool in Post-Secondary Settings in BC

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Project team

Ecce Wahine: Towards a Māori translation of Western texts

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Project team

Generations: How identity, equality and participation impact the realization of indigenous education rights

The main aim of my doctoral research is to show that specifically indigenous education rights are crucial to the realization of equality in education and other fundamental rights and freedoms for indigenous people. In contrast to prevailing American jurisprudence on discrimination and the kind of rhetoric present in the 2004 Foreshore and Seabed saga which relies on an anonymous model of the liberal individual, I will argue that recognizing and protecting specifically indigenous education rights actually combats discrimination and enhances substantial equality.

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