Projects

Haka and hula representations in tourism

 Haka and hula performances tell stories that represent histories, traditions, protocols and customs of the Māori and Hawai’ian people and give insight into their lives and the way that they see the world. The way that haka and hula performances are represented is being tested, as the dynamics of the tourism industry impact upon and influence the art forms. If allowed, these impacts and influences can affect the performances and thus manipulate or change the way that haka and hula are represented.

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Hauora Kotahitanga. Maori health experiences as models for co-operative co-existence between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples

The purpose of this thesis is to examine Maori experiences of the development and delivery of indigenous knowledge-based Maori health (hauora) models, and to consider the experiences and hauora models conceptually as models for co-operative co-existence (kotahitanga) between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.
Two key debates emerge from the indigenous health development literature: firstly, how and why could nations be more constructive in their engagements with indigenous peoples to ensure indigenous knowledge and practices remain or become a vital part of indigenous, national and global health developments, and secondly, how can health researchers best seek an understanding of, and effectively communicate, these indigenous experiences to non-indigenous audiences, without losing the authenticity of the indigenous experience studied? This thesis takes an indigeneity approach in its contribution to these two indigenous health development debates. The examination is of hauora models in the Tihi Ora health sub-region of the Ngati Whatua peoples, who have a self-determination proposal they have defined as ‘Kotahitanga’. This approach can be summarised as how Ngati Whatua practice their rangatiratanga (leadership, authority and self determination) and manawhenua (responsibility for their lands and peoples on their lands) through a kotahitanga (co-operative co-existence) approach.
The study is based on five case studies of Maori health organisations in the Tihi Ora region. It examines how the Maori health organisations implemented matauranga (Maori knowledge) through tikanga (methodology) models they had created as hauora services for Maori and non-Maori in their communities from the 1990s. In particular it is an examination of the constructive engagements that occurred between Maori health organisations and their communities, in the development and delivery of their hauora services. The findings of the research are then conceptualised as models for kotahitanga between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples. The study includes a health policy analysis of the matauranga within indigenous health policies in the 1990s to explore whether policy created tikanga, or whether matauranga created tikanga and policy, in the study period of 1980 to 2008. The research suggests that there was congruence in the matauranga found in the case studies and policy analysis, but that the tikanga-based hauora models were highly differentiated and uniquely created to achieve their community’s distinctive expectations. The hauora kotahitanga models therefore functioned on how community members chose to live together differently through matauranga Maori.

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Home – A Book Project

Expertise: 

An edited collection written by 43 Māori and Indigenous academics troubling the notion of home and their critical analysis of issues within the home community. Due to be published 2014.

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Indigenous Health Literacy Framework: Evaluation of a Health Literacy Cardiovascular Disease Intervention

Region: 

The current research project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a health literacy focused cardiovascular disease (CVD) intervention developed by the International Collaborative Indigenous Health Research Partnership (ICIHRP). The ICIHRP research is investigating if health literacy can be strengthened through culturally appropriate interventions with indigenous peoples. The New Zealand component of the international project is targeted at Māori participants and their whānau and my research will run alongside this work.

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International Network on Indigenous Knowledge, Risk Interpretation and Action

Region: 

This project will involve collecting, synthesizing and sharing data on indigenous knowledge - including worldviews, experiences, practices and approaches – related to risk perception, interpretation and action facing both man-made and natural disasters and climate change in five countries. The four ISSC scholars that participated in the RIA seminar in New Zealand, plus invited Maori scholar Dr. Simon Lambert, will develop structured study-cases focusing on their regions, and share them during a workshop to be organized at University of Florida in the second semester of 2014.

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