Projects

Indigenous Health Literacy Framework: Evaluation of a Health Literacy Cardiovascular Disease Intervention

Region: 

The current research project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a health literacy focused cardiovascular disease (CVD) intervention developed by the International Collaborative Indigenous Health Research Partnership (ICIHRP). The ICIHRP research is investigating if health literacy can be strengthened through culturally appropriate interventions with indigenous peoples. The New Zealand component of the international project is targeted at Māori participants and their whānau and my research will run alongside this work.

View project

Project team

Marae food gardens: Health and wellbeing through urban marae in Tāmaki Makaurau

Efforts to reduce health inequalities for indigenous peoples need to tackle a broad range of issues and work at many different levels. Health promotion interventions must be designed to address these issues and empower indigenous people to take control of their own lives in pursuit of health and wellbeing. Targeted interventions like community food gardens are an example of a health promotion intervention that can have wide-ranging benefits for physical, social, cultural and environmental wellbeing.

View project

Project team

Maungatautari Ecological Island Trust

Region: 

Since 2018 I have participated as a Mana Whenua Trustee on the Maungatautari Ecological Island Trust. Where I represent Paaraawera Marae.

Working with both Iwi and Mana Whenua, and the wider Waipaa Community. To enhance the Mauri and the Mana of Maungatautari for everyone.

Being part of a strategic leadership and development team/board consisting of: 

  • Corporate,
  • Mana Whena,
  • Iwi,
  • Community, and;
  • Landowners.

Key Highlights:

View project

Project team

Networks of Support for Māori Mental Health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes.

This research looks at how the 2010-2011 earthquakes in Ōtautahi/Christchurch have affected Māori mental health communities. In particular we look at how the support networks for Tangata Whaiora (‘people seeking health’, a term applied to Māori mental health clients) and their whānau responded and recovered through the disaster. Tangata Whaiora have expressed a desire to record their stories; our role as researchers is to analyse and communicate how their experiences provide unique and significant perspectives on surviving and flourishing after devastating disruption and dislocation.

View project

Project team

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whānau Ora Action Research Project

Region: 
View project

Project team