Projects

Aue Ha! Māori men’s relational health

This project addresses the crucial gap in previous research by studying the everyday lives and positive relationships of Māori men in the context of men’s health. Māori men face many challenges in maintaining health and in developing meaningful and culturally patterned relationships.

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Contested Boundaries: Indigenous Peoples, Tourism and Protected Areas in Canada and New Zealand.

Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Insight Development Grant (2016-2018)

Co-Investigators: Dr Courtney Mason (Thompson Rivers University), William Snow (Nakoda Consultation, Alberta) .

This international collaboration is a comparative study of how Indigenous communities in Western Canada and New Zealand are reasserting their cultural rights in the co-management and management of national parks and protected areas with a focus on issues relating to policy/planning input, consultation, representation and empowerment.

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International Network on Indigenous Knowledge, Risk Interpretation and Action

Region: 

This project will involve collecting, synthesizing and sharing data on indigenous knowledge - including worldviews, experiences, practices and approaches – related to risk perception, interpretation and action facing both man-made and natural disasters and climate change in five countries. The four ISSC scholars that participated in the RIA seminar in New Zealand, plus invited Maori scholar Dr. Simon Lambert, will develop structured study-cases focusing on their regions, and share them during a workshop to be organized at University of Florida in the second semester of 2014.

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Project team

Networks of Support for Māori Mental Health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes.

This research looks at how the 2010-2011 earthquakes in Ōtautahi/Christchurch have affected Māori mental health communities. In particular we look at how the support networks for Tangata Whaiora (‘people seeking health’, a term applied to Māori mental health clients) and their whānau responded and recovered through the disaster. Tangata Whaiora have expressed a desire to record their stories; our role as researchers is to analyse and communicate how their experiences provide unique and significant perspectives on surviving and flourishing after devastating disruption and dislocation.

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Project team